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environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
in that environment, it has been hard to convince others of the need to sustain necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or a collection of institutions that are basically on steroids. the rest of our government, which is essentially on life- support. that is hard to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department is that you need to get back -- get by on cunning and strategy. you do not have the resources the other branches of the government has. the hope that there will be balanced in the account period ahead, the new budget includes the state department as part of the national security as a whole. i would not hold my breath. i think it will be hard making the case robusta diplomacy. my hope is that it will be a bipartisan effort. it will be challenged not matter much. my primary -- it will be challenged no matter what. we need something that will allow our forces to do several things. first, we need a robust change of views on strategy and our overall approach is. the kind of thing that chris laid out on talking abou
environment you are going into which is the culture, which is the underlying framework of economic, social, sociallily what's going on within a country. we have to do a better job of understanding. that we've learned that lesson. we're incorporating that better. we have to be able to be adaptive and agile as we adjust the type of techniques and the capabilities we have when we get into an operation. >> more with general ray odierno, army chief of staff, in just a moment. you're watching "this week in defense news." >>> we're back with army chief of staff general ray odierno. sir, one of your priority efforts is to redesign the brigade combat teams. why is that so necessary, and what are we going to see come out of that process? >> well what we've learned is, in terms of brigade combat team, we need it to be agile and flexible enough to operate across a broad spectrum of missions. we've done a significant amount of analysis both technical analysis, tactical analysis, to come up with a new design. so the one thing that's absolutely essential is we must have a third ma niewfer battalion -- a
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it a-- it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the
to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of institutions basically on steroids, military and national security and the rest of our government, essentially in my support. that is a very hard team to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department, but one of the things that the challenge as he got to get by and cunning and guile and strategy. if you don't have the programs come you don't have the resources at their riches of the government have. the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole. but i wouldn't hold my breath. you think it's going to be hard and making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope would be a bipartisan affair, but it's going to be a challenge to matter what. secondly unmelted now,, my primary inter
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
, shape the environment after you get out? and i think that's what all of this talk about 2014 in afghanistan is, to focus the minds of afghan leaders. we are not going to be around. and i actually think iraq has gone better than i expected. so, who knows. afghanistan might too. i'm actually though in the long run, more pessimistic about afghanistan than i am about iraq. >> start by why do you think iraq has gone better than expected and then michael will talk about where you think there's gaps in this path's approach to t. >> i thought that iraq would unravel after the americans left. in fact, aid series on my blog called "iraq, the unraveling." it hasn't. rather it has sort of come to a stalemate it is not falling apart but not making any political progress it is just sort of sitting there, not a great situation but actually better than i personally expected when i last took a long look at iraq. what people forget in this country though is iraq, even right now, is still more violent than afghanistan is. >> well, i actually think the search was considerable success in a milita
this government create an environment for small business. i come from a long line of small business. i owned a small thises and ran a small loss form -- long form for many years. business acumen does not translate into good government. what we need in maine and in america is to invest in education, infrastructure, to reform our taxes, to reduce our spending, and to get this economy on track so the government can provide an environment for small businesses to grow and prosper and to help families get through this economy. the disparity in income is the biggest problem. what might two major opponents offer is more of the same. >> we have some business owners. does anyone want to answer? >> i am not a small business owner. i never said i was. i am self-employed. i am a free-lance writer. if you are a political pundits like i am, if you run for senate, you are no longer a political pundit. not only have i not created a job, but i cost myself a job by running for office. on that question, i do not have a good record. >> i think it is sad the recently we have looked at government services as being
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
at just the work environment where do you look at the home environment. a lot of habits that you have a development for home, you want people to practice safe computing wherever they are. whether or not it is their device from your device, or whatever kind of device. so i think that to sympathize with the public to the challenges and in a way that we did keep america beautiful, keep america safe, i think that we really need to do that. the second point -- i have three of them. the second point is that the sky is falling ocean is just hurting us. because people say yeah, right. but i think that we need to not communicate the sky is falling in the sky is just not going to fall. a lot of people compare now to what we did and there was a certain amount of sky is falling with y2k. the sky didn't fall. nothing fell out the sky. yet we felt we spent a lot of time and resources. last one i want to make is that it is difficult to share information when we have two political fortunes to classify. it is something that i need to know or communicate. i can't communicate what you guys right now. bu
to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines ca
it in a responsible way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. ashink, let's use this area an example that we can hold up around the rest of the country. >> rebuttal from con
themselves quite well in the debates. but the point is, they're in this larger environment, what is going to go on. i worry we're going to see muddling through instead of clear-cut tax reform, infrastructure program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's --
supplies are going down. they are going down because of the burdens and regulatory environments shutting down power plants. what we have to do is look at my energy plan. it is an all of the above approach. we have to ensure that we put more plants in action. more nuclear facilities so america continues to lead economically. if we put ourselves at an economic disadvantage because we are meeting emissions targets that are already doing better than most industrialized we hold let's make sure anybody else accountable in the world. start worrying about the american energy and american economy. the pipeline, that is thousands of jobs that can be created right now in america with a signature from president obama. that needs to happen. let's make sure we maximize our missions controls, we utilize natural gas, and we look at expanding our nuclear options here in this country. >> 30 seconds. >> renewals can take care of -- i do not claim renewable can take care of all our energies at this time. we need to take a big step forward. we find ourselves unable to when we have people beholden to oil and
environment. when jack markell ran he put together a blueprint for delaware. we have not done a good enough job of creating that environment. >> let us go to the follow up. we stand on the blueprint for delaware? >> we still of war to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to agree to dollar version. we have not been able to add as much as we would like. mr. gregg can say hispanic, but it is not spin. it is not spin to the people -- jeff craig can say is sprin. in. these are real jobs, real family is being put back to work. >> feel free to offer your opinion. >> it is then 30,000 unemployed from 18,000 additional who have dropped out of the workforce, people of taken part-time jobs, we can argue, but on election day those people will go to the polls and make a decision. >> of cited the high percentage of people in delaware and a part of their paychecks from the government. if you are to trim down the government are produced exasperatingly problem? >> i moved to delaware in the late 1980's. today the largest employer is the state of delaware, the second largest is th
an understanding of an environment -- if you come back to - 0, about focusing on the customer and producing products that our customers really want and value, it is an understanding in a sense of the economics, distribution, vehicles, the supply base. i talk about the 12,000 jobs at ford, the jobs in the supply base and related engineering activities. i really just keep coming back to the market itself, the opportunity to put great vehicles out there, to focus on the things people really want, and to talk back to the high- tech jobs. historically, our industry, particularly the domestic manufacturers in the detroit area -- for now, competitors of rust belt. we made a commitment to engineer the highest quality vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in every sector the we compete in every market around the world. if you come back to some of the investments i mentioned earlier, a very large percentage of those investments have been in very high-technology power trends, weather they are hybrid vehicles, battery, electronic vehicles. we now have six electrified the nichols we will be selling
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
capital needs, economic needs and needs for support in its environment, its region for a very long time. that has been the point of some of the things that are not to do with nato and not to do with me that have been going on over this year. so there has been an istanbul process in which regional countries got together, it was followed up be a kabul conference this summer, a series of regional confidence-building measures. those are now going with support from the international community. foreign secretary, for instance, was in kabul in the summer for the second of those conferences and promised support to that process where we can. there is the international aid picture, 4.1 billion promised to the ansf or pledged to the ansf up to 2017. there is also a further 16 billion, roughly the same amount per year, on civil development aid up til then. so there are a lot of other actors. i'm not going to speak on their behalf. it's not my job, and i could mislead you, but what i will say is that what is done by isaf and what is done by our armed forces are a smaller part of that longer-term pic
and youtube. tweets on twitter. people go on the site and cares about environment the syria club might be featured. they pay for advertising that way. >> and that is enough to keep it -- how big is that? >> 150 staff around the world. >> wow. 20 million members. >> that's a lot of . >> yeah. toll it's about the massive kale. scale the number of people -- internet and that's amazings the capacity moral historical change. because of the facility and the rapid expansion because that have we have more members able to generate more revenue. >> we were talking about this last night on the panel. reheading toward if we have not passed a billion spent on television advertising. most going to nine states and 6 percent of the population. you're at the point it would been cheaper to buy every undecided voter a television at this point. hi i'm romney here with a plasma for you. i'm interested in your thought you mentioned politician and talking about congress in responding what about the way that -- you do you think the balance of the way we communicate in the race for president along with the sup
some major advancement that would be great for the environment. obviously, the youth vote is very critical. it is also very unusual that people care so much. [inaudible] so you are lucky and blessed to be listening to and to be part of this election. >> tim? >> though, i wanted people to step up a little bit. we talked about fiscally conservative people, and i would like to see some socially liberal liberals. we didn't get into the juggler or civil liberties were a bunch of other things. and i would like to see something from the left. as far as i can see, we have gone butkus on all those issues. every couple of years, there is a big debate that are held in some false. a connection between libertarians and conservatives, is coming to an end? my friend, jonah goldberg, says it has a pretty good idea -- libertarians are useful because they ask the question should the government be doing the thing we are talking about. there are some things that libertarians can learn from conservatives. one of the roots of conservatism -- after eight years of bush in four years of obama, i'm not sur
women's healthcare, not a single one of those votes talked about the environment, not a single vote talked about transportation infrastructure, not a single vote were dealing on education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the 10th district and are critical votes. my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. >> if we look at the record this congress, which is the most uneffective congress we've had, you voted twice on the ryan plan that turns medicare. a voucher plan. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted on them on issue after issue. >> congressman dold, your vote on obamacare, why you vote against it? >> you look at the affordable care act. there are things in there that are positive. >> how come? >> because i think we want to call it by its name. long end short, we got 21 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on new set ten years doubled. this is going to be enormously troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. you're talking about a t
environment. >> you agree with me that it is easier, more fun, and potentially more successful to play the game of sport as opposed to this serious business of -- >> i'm not robbing a bank because that's where the money is, but i agree that drives it, as well. but i don't let the candidates off the hook. i think -- you know, when we start beating up ourselves in the media, we deserve our blame. but we've got campaigns that have no substance to talk about. i mean, and one what are their -- do they get on twitter, goat youtube with the ads? they spin us about polls. you ask the romney people to explain how they're going to pay for their tax cut. you don't get an answer. you want a jobs plan from obama, you don't get an answer. >> on that point of what the campaigns themselves are serving up, and of course we tend to cover what they are talking about, obama campaign ad has gotten a whole lot of attention the last couple of days. lina dunham, creator and star of hor's "girls," saying this about why she is swooning for the president. >> the first time shouldn't be with just anybody. you wan
people think is the changing media environment. you mentioned we have not had prosecutions of reporters are media organizations, but i am wondering if your thoughts, and the challenges posed by the changing media landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints t
discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went in an interview bin laden, the last western journalist the trekked into the mountains in afghanistan, and we did a prime-time special or two, but i had some dealings with the military in washington he said their biggest concern was an act of domestic terrorism. we had active discussions about doing more. in retrospect wish
practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ john: [applause] john: now, your comments or questis for my guests, columnist ellis henican and ann coulter. first, from my facebook page. david gerald asks, our guy, completely wrong. >> i think it is not exactly being wrong. conservatives aren't enthusiastic about the war in afghanistan. i think most conservative think itould have been better if mubarak said state and not be replaced by the muslim brotherhood. think that is very hard to explain in egypt. moreover, republicans, look, it's over. republicans are not democrats. we don't criticize military action that is already been taken for. conservatives understand that. i don't speak for romney. i don't know if i'm right about that, but i suspect. that is just an example of republicans not criticizing military action has already been taken. >> so, with the bush tax cuts. he did not get as what we needed. extended beyond fairness up and down the economy, and it made 55 and you careo much about it worse.
. they've really adapted well to this environment. very challenging the last few years. but the problem now is you need the topline growth, increases in sales. they're not getting them. so it's a question of how much more can they cut. >> corporations really stripped down they're expenses and squeeze profits out of the last couple of years, but as james says, if you can't grow revenue after a certain point you can't grow profits. >> that's right. dow chemical just announced they're going to lay off 2,400 people. that's a lot of layoffs, a lot of people getting fired, banks are doing the same thing. i think steve raised a good point. recovery. the recession ended the middle of 2009. three years later are we still supposed to be talking bat recovery? we should be talking about a normal economy. the post war growth rate for the united states economy is about 3% or a little bit better. a point below that is not going to create an economy that creates jobs for all those people who stopped looking for work. and i think there really is a serious question of whether obama's new normal is in fac
that kind of individualized attention may be harder to get now in the environment that states are moving to. states really there in the degree to which the shift to automated method is being pushed versus just being offered as an additional opportunity for accessing the program. and so i think it's important to remember that not all low income population of access to the technology, to the internet or the same ability to be able to use it. we hear about prepaid cell phone plans being a problem for people when have to wait on hold for a long time or participate in an interview over the telephone. many states are closing local offices, which would mean that people live in remote areas have to drive farther if they do want to be able to see somebody and talk to things within. and are increased, or still have reports of uncommon benefits, lost paperwork, long wait times in person and on the telephone. and auto closure, which is sort of the way fancy way of saying that the state had the cheerios for people but didn't have the time to act on it so the computer automatically will close cases. and
case of what actually happened there, but i think in this highly partisan environment right now no one believes what anybody says right now on either side. right now if you're a republican you believe what republican sources say, if you're a democrat you believe what democratic sources say. and i think that after the election we should have a full accounting of what actually happened there and people who made mistakes should be fired or held accountable as such. but between now and tuesday is not the time to have that debate. between now and tuesday we have to focus on our national election, and again, like i said, nobody believes what anybody is saying any more. it's unfortunate but that's what our politics have come to in this country where we just don't trust each other any more. megyn: chris plant is this very well rant to the national election. >> of course it is. we need answers and deserve answers before the election. the president needs to come out and make it clear whether he was the one making the calls during the massacre in benghazi, whether he was the one that personally i
of how are we going to survive this new environment. publishing is in a precarious position in some ways, and a lot of people think about that. we are constantly trying to change and adapt and sing on top of things. like adding e-books to our website. we are having a website in order we bring in new products all the time and more things that are nonbook items in the store that people really enjoy for gift giving. we definitely have to stay on top of things to make sure we are checking what the next place as we can be going. where are you going to browse? where you going to browse them, where you going to get ideas? well, i personally did not want amazon controlling everything. they are not the people. they are internet people. we want to making the decisions on what gets published and what gets out to the people. if you really want an independent bookstores, it might not >> finding something new by favorite author that he didn't know about. we value the people that work there. >> we continue our look at the literary culture of montpelier, vermont. we hear from the author michaeld coffin
. that could not be more out of touch. a big part of this district is the environment, and so much of our economy is based on our environment. there is a direct correlation, whether it is tour is a more realistic. >> presidential candidate michele bachmann came down here and floated that idea and i was all over her on a -- like a black eye on a pea. when you look at what has happened with planned parenthood, perhaps you should call kathleen sebelius, to whom the agency came out with saint planned parenthood is not doing mammograms. >> both of you have spent a lot of money. it is among the costliest congressional races in the country to support legislation that would limit the influence of outside groups, and is that necessary? >> that needs to be argued in front of the supreme court. the supreme court already made that decision. if you look at our record, we have an incredible amount, almost 95% from individual donors. i cannot help but that people want to donate. if outside groups, some have placed $5 million in attacks against me. so be it at my opponent's father created pack specifical
an environment in washington, d.c., where we are working together. we are trying to create an environment of working together. it is a political year. of course she is going to endorse the senator that best represents her local view, which is connected. >> senator, your turn. >> she did not endorse me. she just said what the record was. politics should never trump jobs. the problem was not wanting to invest in this country. clean water and clean air, it is a $3 billion industry, and we can have both, but you need regulations, and 50 days before an election they announced three years ago they are going to kill the plant. >> he brought us the company from an action the epa took, and epa was told by the chamber of commerce that if you took that action if you voted not to suspend the rules, they would not have to prevent it. that is the problem. you see bureaucrats are dictating policy in montana. we can do just fine. >> the congressman has talked about 95% and other things that are patently false. they said they could deal with these rules. the problem they have is with ash and hayes. they c
these votes not a single one talked about women's healthcare or the environment, not a single one talked about the votes education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to the 10th district and i think are critical votes. >> if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective congress we've had in our life times. he voted twice on the ryan plan and voucher program. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times genls obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue. >> you raced an important one. congressman dole your votes on obama care you voted against it is why? >> the affordable care ak act, there are things positive. >> you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare? >> we need to call it by its name. we have 2 new taxes on this. the estimates on the new set of 10 years doubled so this is going to be troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. after two years it is doubling so i think this is troubling because small businesses are looking at how can i pay the penalty and tell people the
, which are limited government and lower taxes and less regulatory environment. in colorado, where you find is in her to give her as he moved west across the united states, and republican voter is a quasi- libertarian type of voter. it is limited government. it is kind of an old west at it, keep government out of our lives. i think you also see others that will move toward the center as well. it is limited government and less washington d.c. involvement in our lives. an oldhost: what is the makeupe state legislature? guest: we have a slight majority in the state house for republicans. we control the state house. and the senate, a slim majority for the democrats. the attorney general and other statewide elected officials are republican. and our governor is a democrat and very popular. it is representative of the voting population we are little helter-skelter. host: mary and westfield and new jersey, independent caller. caller: can you hear me? host: my fault, go ahead. caller: two questions. the president says that north america will be energy independent. how come the press does not re
interesting but i would never watch this on a plane flight. i'm much too tough to that. macho environment. you can't be watching katy perry so i get on the bus and vogelsong, philadelphia, vogel strong, super stuff, he goes, you know, we're talk on the bus everyone is talking he's like, you know, i watched that katy perry part of me movie and man it was really awesome and we all started having this huge discussion like and i'm like man he had the courage to watch that and tell us. [ laughter ] >> and as the giants season officially closes, the warriors begins tonight. stephen curry was limited to just 26 games last season. but the warriors need offed to make a commitment to their point guard -- needed to make a commitment though their point guard or tonight risk losing him to free agency at the end of the season. >> i text him last night i got shots up at the gym and text him on the way home if you need to borrow my pen, i got an extra pen for him. i'd love to have him here for as many years as he can. >> david lee's pen probably came in handy once curry signed his four-year, $44 million exten
. >> they can expect a warm, friendly interactive environment. we have a transformation team ready to make you look fabulous and a loot of women shop for spanx based -- lot of women shop for spanx based on their outfit and body shape. we have so many different yarns and things our transportation experts can help a woman and customer navigate. >> reporter: she said the new store has something for everyone including men. >> their undershirts have been the same 100 years. we tapered it at the waistline, added lycra so it doesn't stretch out easy and it makes guys go a belt loop tighter. we want to go international and tysons corner is just the start. >> reporter: in virginia beth parker, fox 5 news. >>> coming up next the x-factor goes live, the judges talk about doing their first live show together and what's next for the remaining contestants. >> on the news edge at 11:00 a fight caught on camera at a local high school, why the mother of one of these girls claims this could have been prevented. anncr: which do you believe? what mitt romney's tv ads say about women? or what mitt romney himself
was named the world's youngest self- made billionaire by forbes magazine. >> they can expect an environment that is warm and friendly and interactive. we have a transformation team that is ready to make you look fabulous and a lot of women buy spanx based on the outfit they're wearing and the body shape. and so many things that the transformation officers can help a woman navigate. >> reporter: the new storm has something for everyone, including men. >> and for 100 years, no one's paid attention to it. we tapered it in at the waste line and added light where it doesn't stretch out easy and makes guys go about tighter. >> reporter: where does she go from here? future plans world domination. no butt left behind. we want to go international and tyson's corners to start. beth parker, fox 5 news. >> and no butt left behind. that is a slogan of a bottom air, right in. >> you have 2450 tharight. >>> let's go to brian for a look at what is coming up next on the news edge six. >>> when disaster strikes, people need help right away. why hurricane sandy survivors say they have been forgotten. >>> then
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